The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2

Thursday, October 3, 2019
Wave, painted by Japanese, Hokusai.

You might read the first part of this post: The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 1.

Then, because barely talk, Kino knew customer name is Kamita after two months in touch. The mysterious stray cat then to stay with Kino, gave him such unconditional comfort.

Kamita is combine of two words, “kami” means god and “ta” means field.

One day, a lot of snakes come to the bar. Kamita suggested Kino to go far away a while for good.

As mentioned by author mysteriously, “Kamita’s words had a strange persuasive power that went beyond logic. Kino didn’t doubt him. He stuffed some clothes and toiletries into a medium-sized shoulder bag, the same bag he’d used on business trips,” Murakami (2015). 



Goldfinch and cherry tree, painted by Hokusai.

Moreover, the author was born in Kyoto, the former imperial capital of Japan in 1949.

As described by Anderson (2011) that author had a jazz club for ten years. He did daily operation of club by clearing away, making burger, listening to music and blending drinks until midnight.

It is understandable that author’s experienced could reflect in his fictions. The writer story style is most in ordinary setting.

The short story of “Kino” is developed line by line with plenty of mood there. The messages are mixed: simple, sad, supernatural, ambiguity, soothing and haunting at the same time.

The sentences are beautiful, full of imagination and surprise at some point. I like to read the story. 

References
Anderson, S. (2011). The Fierce Imagination of Haruki Murakami. The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved from New Yorker.


Murakami, H. 2015. Kino. The New Yorker, February 23 & March 2, 2015 Issue. Retrieved from New Yorker.

38 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Wave, painted by Japanese, Hokusai.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      You might read the first part of this post: The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 1.

      Delete
  4. I do love these stories. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Then, because barely talk, Kino knew customer name is Kamita after two months in touch. The mysterious stray cat then to stay with Kino, gave him such unconditional comfort.

      Delete
  5. Very beautiful story. Thanks for sharing.

    Best regards

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Kamita is combine of two words, “kami” means god and “ta” means field.

      Delete
  6. Bonjour,

    C'est toujours un plaisir que de lire vos petits billets...

    Un immense merci pour votre visite sur mon blog. Je suis ravie que mes peintures puissent vous apporter du bonheur.

    Gros bisous et bon week-end 🌸

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      One day, a lot of snakes come to the bar. Kamita suggested Kino to go far away a while for good.

      Delete
  7. Thank you for the great review:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      As mentioned by author mysteriously, “Kamita’s words had a strange persuasive power that went beyond logic. Kino didn’t doubt him. He stuffed some clothes and toiletries into a medium-sized shoulder bag, the same bag he’d used on business trips,” Murakami (2015).

      Delete
  8. A very beautiful story.
    Have a good weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Goldfinch and cherry tree, painted by Hokusai.

      Delete
  9. Interesting post, nice classic paintings too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Moreover, the author was born in Kyoto, the former imperial capital of Japan in 1949.

      Delete
  10. thank you - I haven't heard of it before, and I was interested ☺
    best regards
    Lili

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      As described by Anderson (2011) that author had a jazz club for ten years. He did daily operation of club by clearing away, making burger, listening to music and blending drinks until midnight.

      Delete
  11. This is new to me, I've never heard of this until now, and I'm very glad to read your explanation about it. Thanks for sharing this interesting information.

    Wishing you all the best!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      It is understandable that author’s experienced could reflect in his fictions. The writer story style is most in ordinary setting.

      Delete
  12. I know that first painting, so pretty☺

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      The short story of “Kino” is developed line by line with plenty of mood there. The messages are mixed: simple, sad, supernatural, ambiguity, soothing and haunting at the same time.

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      The sentences are beautiful, full of imagination and surprise at some point. I like to read the story.

      Delete
  14. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Wave, painted by Japanese, Hokusai.

      Delete
  15. I love Hokusai! Not to be pedantic, but...

    They're prints, not paintings. Japanese woodblock prints are one of my favorite media. I saw some really nice ones of Vermont scenery recently - way out of my price range but impressive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see...

      Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      You might read the first part of this post: The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 1.

      Delete
  16. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Then, because barely talk, Kino knew customer name is Kamita after two months in touch. The mysterious stray cat then to stay with Kino, gave him such unconditional comfort.

      Delete
  17. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      Kamita is combine of two words, “kami” means god and “ta” means field.

      Delete
  18. I like very much the artist Hokusai who is incredibly gifted and created magnificent paintings.
    And I was reading with a great interest the short story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life.
    THANK YOU!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Hokusai is one of Japanese great artists. His works reflected daily life of Japan social levels.

      Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      One day, a lot of snakes come to the bar. Kamita suggested Kino to go far away a while for good.
      -

      Delete
  19. Thank you so much for the explanation and information. Interesting! Have a great Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit:
      The Short Story of Japanese Kino Enigmatic Life – Part 2
      -
      As mentioned by author mysteriously, “Kamita’s words had a strange persuasive power that went beyond logic. Kino didn’t doubt him. He stuffed some clothes and toiletries into a medium-sized shoulder bag, the same bag he’d used on business trips,” Murakami (2015).

      Delete