Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?

Monday, May 13, 2019
From left to right: female, a Half-Male Half-Female and male birds,
credit to Daily Mail

Hermaphrodite is a term refers to organisms which have both sexes, male and female. Well known example is worms (earth worms).

How about if an organism has a “Half-Male Half-Female” sex organ? It is called as a “bilateral gynandromorph.”

This kind of anomaly cause a half body as a male and another part is female.

In case of bird, a cardinal bird, for simplify that a male is identified by his red color, while female is shown by her pale brown or gray brown or brownish yellow.

We are easy to distinguish male and female by color of cardinal birds.

Recently, a bird watcher in Pennsylvania, USA, Shirley Caldwell observed a cardinal with “split coat” in her backyard.

Experts believed the bird is a Half-Male Half-Female organism. 

As reported by Gray (2014) that this kind of “bilateral gynandromorph” bird was first time spotted in 2008. It regularly visited Rock Island, Illinois. 

Female cardinal in nature

Uniquely, a cardinal with rare sex appearance had never sing, no mate, lonely, not “bullied” and ignored by other cardinals.

Even thought a rare case, scientists believed that bilateral gynandromorph could be found in all bird species, especially to species with distinctly different between male and female.

Male cardinal in nature

Have you ever seen bilateral gynandromorph or Half-Male Half-Female birds?

Reference
Gray, R. 2014. The lonely life of the half-male half-female bird: Northern cardinal with bizarre split plumage is ignored by its peers in Illinois. Retrieved from Daily Mail, 31 December 2014. 

40 comments:

  1. How fascinating! I did not know this could happen with birds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. all bird species also reported to have a Half-Male Half-Female sex organ

      Thank you to visit my article:
      Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      From left to right: female, a Half-Male Half-Female and male birds,
      credit to Daily Mail

      Delete
  2. I haven't heard of that before, was wondering if it was a fake picture, it is so sad you don't know anymore these days they can fake pictures so well. That would be something to see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. not fake, since it was reported by mainstream medias like national geographic, nbc news etc.... also science media such as: livescience….

      # My pictures just for illustrations..... but many real pictures and even video

      Delete
    2. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      Hermaphrodite is a term refers to organisms which have both sexes, male and female. Well known example is worms (earth worms).

      Delete
  3. Gosh, I suppose that the appearance of half-unique birds is half-colored and is the result of an engineering that was deliberately made by its keepers ...

    It turns out that there really is a bird like that ...
    Very unique.

    The genetics are also very rare, combined between male and female.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      How about if an organism has a “Half-Male Half-Female” sex organ? It is called as a “bilateral gynandromorph.”

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      This kind of anomaly cause a half body as a male and another part is female.

      Delete
  5. Wow! I have never seen a hermaphrodite bird or any other animal for that matter. Very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      In case of bird, a cardinal bird, for simplify that a male is identified by his red color, while female is shown by her pale brown or gray brown or brownish yellow.

      Delete
  6. So interesting. I've never heard about it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male, Half-Female Bird?
      @
      We are easy to distinguish male and female by color of cardinal birds.

      Delete
  7. Kita biasa menggunakan kata hermaprodit ut cwo yang melambai hehehe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male, Half-Female, Bird?
      @
      Recently, a bird watcher in Pennsylvania, USA, Shirley Caldwell observed a cardinal with “split coat” in her backyard.

      Delete
  8. Well I never! Fascinating little bird!
    Wren x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      Experts believed the bird is a Half-Male Half-Female organism.

      Delete
  9. I've never seen it but I find it fascinating!
    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      As reported by Gray (2014) that this kind of “bilateral gynandromorph” bird was first time spotted in 2008. It regularly visited Rock Island, Illinois.

      Delete
  10. Wow! I had no idea. We see cardinals all the time - nearly always a mating pair in our yard. I'll keep an eye out for this phenomenon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      Uniquely, a cardinal with rare sex appearance had never sing, no mate, lonely, not “bullied” and ignored by other cardinals.

      Delete
  11. That is so interesting Tanza!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      Even thought a rare case, scientists believed that bilateral gynandromorph could be found in all bird species, especially to species with distinctly different between male and female.

      Delete
  12. Great bird. I have never seen such a variation in sex/colour.
    Have a nice evening.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      Have you ever seen bilateral gynandromorph or Half-Male Half-Female birds?

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male, Half-Female Bird?
      @
      From left to right: female, a Half-Male Half-Female and male birds,
      credit to Daily Mail

      Delete
  14. I have not seen them either, but they are cute ­čśŹ
    greetings
    Lili

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen, a, Half-Male, Half-Female, Bird?
      @
      Hermaphrodite is a term refers to organisms which have both sexes, male and female. Well known example is worms (earth worms).

      Delete
  15. Wow is very interesting. I ve never seen them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      How about if an organism has a “Half-Male Half-Female” sex organ? It is called as a “bilateral gynandromorph.”

      Delete
  16. I've never seen one, but I have seen a few albino animals.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      This kind of anomaly cause a half body as a male and another part is female.

      Delete
    2. Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?

      Delete
  17. OMG!! I never heard of a split coat like that. WE have a lot of cardinals here in PA. I will have to keep an eye out for one. We also have coyotes in NJ and my daughter has seen one in the field close to her house that is albino. It is always alone. Thanks for an interesting article.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have, You, Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      In case of bird, a cardinal bird, for simplify that a male is identified by his red color, while female is shown by her pale brown or gray brown or brownish yellow.

      Delete
  18. Never heard or seen one. Will be looking out for them now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      @
      We are easy to distinguish male and female by color of cardinal birds.

      Delete
  19. Fascinating...have never known this before ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you to visit my article:
      Have You Seen a Half-Male Half-Female Bird?
      -
      Recently, a bird watcher in Pennsylvania, USA, Shirley Caldwell observed a cardinal with “split coat” in her backyard.

      Delete